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Limpograss2.jpg
Limpograss1.jpg
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Limpograss
Scientific Name: Hemarthria altissima
Cultivars:Floralta, Bigalta, Redalta, Greenalta (these last two are not recommended because of lower forage quality)
Growth Habit:Erect to decumbent, with stolons rooting at nodes, reddish stems.
Life Cycle:Perennial
Origin:South Africa
Production Season:April-October (extended if no frost)
Nutritive Value:Varies depending on management and variety. Usually, low in crude protein but medium to high digestibility.
Mature stocked piled grass is low in protein concentration (3-5%)
Use:
  • Grazing, hay, haylage, stockpiling
  • Area in the state planted to limpograss is approximately 370,500 acres (150,000 has)
  • Herbarium Image:For an herbarium image click this link.

    Adaptation
    Soil:Flatwoods. Sand to clay; moist to wet; seasonally flooded.
    pH:Target 5.5. This grass, however, adapts to very acid soil conditions.
    Rainfall:High moisture and rain
    Temperature:Warm-season, tropical to Subtropical conditions.

    Management
    Planting Date:April-May (if irrigated); best during rainy season (June-August)
    Planting Depth:2-3 inches
    Seeding Rate:1000 to 1500 lb/acre of stem tops or stolons
    Seed Cost:
    Fertilization:For fertilization info click this link
    Production:8 to 10 tons of hay per acre under good fertility and moisture conditions.

    Notes
  • Spittlebugs are likely to be present if thatch builds up; insect overwinters in the egg phase from eggs laid in the dry stems; burning or close mowing in early spring will control spittlebugs.
  • Associates well with Aeschynomene.
  • Manage stubble height to no less than 12 inches when rotationally stocking and no less than 16 inches when continuously stocking.
  • Stubble heights of 20-24 inches will tend to be trampled by cattle.
  • Susceptible to 2,4-D or 2,4-D containing herbicides like Weedmaster.
  • Poor nesting and foraging habitat for quail.


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